Moderate Drinking in Older Adults May Contribute to Heart Damage, Says Chapters Capistrano

While studies have shown that some alcohol can be beneficial for heart health, in older adults the effect may be to the contrary and cutting back is encouraged, notes Chapters Capistrano.

Over the years there have been studies that show some alcohol can reduce the risk of certain heart conditions, but this is not necessarily the case for everyone. Alcohol should be consumed with caution as it can lead to a variety of health concerns.  For older adults, abstaining may be a good choice as new research finds even just one or two drinks per day could increase risk of heart damage. Luxury drug and alcohol rehab center Chapters Capistrano has released a statement to the press regarding these findings and the benefits of reducing drinking.

“A lifetime of drinking certainly takes a toll on the body as alcohol is a harsh substance,” says Mike Shea, founder of Chapters Capistrano in Orange County. “Even those who only drink on occasion are still putting themselves at risk, especially those who are older. It is important that people don’t let a few potential benefits cloud their judgment. As this study shows, drinking may actually do more harm than good in some cases.”

According to the study, alcohol may damage the structure of the heart and lead to it functioning less efficiently.  “Alcohol seemed to most affect the left ventricle, which is the pumping chamber of the heart. The more people drank, the more their heart’s structure and function changed,” explains the NBC News article.  There were 4,466 participants in the study with an average age of 76 years old. In addition, researchers also found that women may be more sensitive to the effects of alcohol than men.

“There are many reasons why seniors may turn to drinking,” says Shea. “For some it has become part of their routine over the years. Others may use it to reduce stress, cope with challenges and life changes, or any number of other things. But what they don’t stop to consider is the damage it is doing to their health. For those who have developed an addiction, despite the negative consequences, they are unable to cut back on drinking.”

Although guidelines from the American Heart Association recommend no more than one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men, for seniors this could still be enough to contribute to heart damage. Furthermore, the article notes that “light to moderate drinking is supposed to be healthful, although alcohol is known to be toxic to the heart. Heavy drinking clearly damages the heart, making heart muscles thicker and more rigid.”

“People are living longer these days and it’s not too late to seek treatment for alcoholism,” says Shea. “Seniors can continue to live a full life and improve their health by maintaining sobriety and exploring alternative ways of dealing with stress and challenges in their lives.” Those struggling with alcohol misuse and alcoholism can find options for recovery at Chapters Capistrano to continue embracing all that life has to offer.


Chapters Capistrano is a luxury drug and alcohol treatment center located in the city of San Clemente in Orange County, Southern California, with two beautiful ocean-view homes. Specializing in all types of substance abuse, Chapters offers flexible treatment programs that are designed to offer greater confidence in addiction recovery. With a thorough approach to detox, counseling and mental health, this center has delivered many success stories. In addition to offering alternative approaches to conventional recovery, Chapters is also recognized for providing guest comfort with exceptional accommodations, private rooms and cell and laptop allowance. Those searching to begin a new “Chapter” in addiction recovery are encouraged to contact the facility today and visit them on Twitter to keep up with current news.

Media Contact
Company Name: Chapters Capistrano
Contact Person: Marvin Kimble
Email: Send Email
Phone: 949-287-8248
Address:1525 Buena Vista
City: San Clemente
State: CA
Country: United States